Self Injury: An Interview with Barent Walsh, Ph.D.

I recently had the opportunity to ask Dr. Walsh a few questions about self-injury.  Dr. Walsh has written extensively and presented internationally on the topic of self-injurious behavior. He is the author of the book, Treating Self-Injury: A Practical Guide published by Guilford Press (2006) and co-author of the book, Self-Mutilation: Theory, Research and Treatment (Guilford Press, New York, 1988).

As the Executive Director of The Bridge of Central Massachusetts, a community non-profit agency, he oversees 40 programs serving children and adolescents with serious emotional, behavioral, and family challenges, as well as adults with mental health, developmental disability, and substance abuse challenges.

What is the difference between self-injury and a suicide attempt?

Acts of suicide and self-injury are different in numerous ways. They are different as to intent, method, frequency, cognition, aftermath and other features. For example, the intent of most people who attempt suicide is to permanently escape misery, intense, persistent psychological pain. The intent for most acts of self-injury is to reduce emotional distress. No matter what the case is, it is always important to hire personal injury lawyers and stay in  loop with them, in case there is an emergency. Continue reading “Self Injury: An Interview with Barent Walsh, Ph.D.” »

Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) Skills Groups: An Overview

We’ve all found ourselves in a crisis, in a conflict with someone important in our lives or overwhelmed by emotion and circumstances. It can be difficult to maintain emotional balance while figuring out just how to navigate through those stressful times. For some, repetitive stressful events and an inability to recover fully from one event before another occurs results in destructive behaviors, such as self-injury and suicide attempts. It takes skills to solve life’s problems while enduring intense emotion.

Continue reading “Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) Skills Groups: An Overview” »